The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio


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A number of phonetic alphabets exist. The NATO version is most common and can be considered to be the "international" phonetic alphabet. Main articles: morse code , Wikipedia:Morse code. Morse code is a way to encode text through the generation of a carrier wave CW. It is used to communicate over long distances or with low power QRP. You do not need to learn morse code to obtain a radio license or operate an amateur radio station anymore.

These codes were originally developed to shorten transmission times when using CW, but are frequently used in voice transmissions. The QRA QUZ code range includes phrases applicable to all services and is allocated to the International Telecommunications Union. Other 'Q' code ranges are allocated specifically to aviation or maritime services; many of those codes have fallen into disuse as voice displaces CW in commercial operation.

The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio John Pertell

The Q-code was originally instituted at the Radiotelegraph Convention held in London, and was intended for marine radiotelegraph use. The codes were based on an earlier list published by the British postmaster general's office in On SSB, the final digit tone is normally omitted. These are referred to as "cut numbers" and are obtained by replacing all of the dashes in a CW digit with a single dash.


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One I know of, and which is used when reporting broadcasting stations and may also be used in some other areas, is the SINPO code. Signal Interference Noise Propagation Overall.


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Now, finally to my simplified Q system for amateur radio but only in those circumstances mentioned earlier regular friends, those who know this system, certain nets, for example , which is simply a short form for either QRK or both QRK and QSA. But do we mention "QSB" to a station in a report?

Nothing new. But ideally we give just one number between 1 and 5 after QSA. You should see my RST column in my log! With QSA this is less likely to happen.

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So the "Qn" or "Qnn" system I advocate among those "in the know" about it is:. After all, R QRK is the most important thing, isnt' it? And the scale is 1 to 5. There is no Zero. So, for example:. What happens if there is no signal to be heard at all?! There are some possible Z codes, e. Or simply, Nil. Same for RST there is not officially 0. So now the reason for this simply Qn or Qnn becomes apparent. Simple eh.

Sending just R5 would be ambiguous, it could mean "Roger, copied message number 5" or "Roger, copied 5 messages". But Q5 would mean clearly QRK5 i. Want to add the signal report? Simple, fast, efficient, less stress than working out an accurate S report! I note there have been ideas floated for amateur radio, to have a new reporting system, given that most CW signals are T9, and simplifying the S.

The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio

In my opinion, this would not happen any time soon, RST it too entrenched, and as I stated at the outset, there is nothing wrong with the RST system. It works, so why break it. The Qn or Qnn system where n is a digit from 1 to 5 that I publish here, is just an alternative, that may prove useful in some circumstances. Create account or Sign in. Join this site. Watch: site category page. Q54 means Readable without difficulty and Strong signal. Thoughts on RST and the Q report systems follow in further detail below. First, let us discuss the RST system.

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The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio
The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio
The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio
The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio
The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio The Q-code Quick Reference Chart For Ham Radio

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